Natural Health Science News The latest news and top resources on natural health.

Archive for December, 2009

Boost your immunity

Posted December 31, 2009

The integrity of our natural personal immune system confers upon our body a defense mechanism which determines our susceptibility to, or the degree of protection we have against, various diseases. Besides a healthy diet, regular physical exercise, abstinence from tobacco and other harmful substances, moderation in alcohol intake, and taking daily multivitamins-mineral (from A to Zinc) supplements, there are food items which can boost our immune system and provide us greater resistance to illnesses

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Feeling chilly? Boost circulation…with some chilli

Posted December 31, 2009

If the freezing temperatures are leaving you with painfully sore fingers and toes, some circulation-boosting herbs might be just what you need. Medically proven to enhance blood flow, they will help to keep warm blood pumping to where you need it that much longer.

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Wheatgrass in convenient health drink

Posted December 31, 2009

Wheatgrass, known as a life-sustaining super food, is an easy way to nourish oneís body. Today, health-conscious consumers can readily stir in the nutritious goodness of this organic plant daily as Fruit Magic, the countryís premier juice bar, makes drinking for better nutrition affordable with the launch of its newest wellness product, the Fruit Magic Wheatgrass Boost.

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Vitamin C, potent anti-aging agent

Posted December 31, 2009

According to a recent research published in the online version of Cell Stem Cell, vitamin C has shown promise in slowing down the ageing process by facilitating output of embryonic-like stem cells from adult cells. By turning on a select set of genes, adult cells can be reprogrammed into cells with features similar to embryonic stem cells.

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Pesticides in Foods can be Verified With a ‘dipstick’ Test

Posted December 31, 2009

A team of Canadian scientists has come out with a quick and inexpensive ‘dipstick’ test to identify small amounts of pesticides that may exist in foods and beverages. Their paper-strip test is more practical than conventional pesticide tests, producing results in minutes rather than hours by means of an easy-to-read color-change, they say.

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Vegetarian Fiber, EFAs

Posted December 31, 2009

For those looking to specifically augment their intake of whole-food sources of fiber and essential fatty acids (EFAs), vegetarian options are available, including chia, hemp and maca.

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Toxic metals may influence autism severity

Posted December 31, 2009

Children with higher levels of metals ñ such as lead and antimony ñ in their urine had more severe autism, suggesting that metal levels in their bodies may contribute to its seriousness. The severity of a child’s autism coincided with the levels of toxic metals excreted in their urine after treatment with a metals removal therapy, finds a study published in the Journal of Toxicology. The higher the levels of lead, antimony and other metals excreted, the more severe was the child’s autism.

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The Links Between Sugar and Mental Health

Posted December 31, 2009

Noted British psychiatric researcher Malcolm Peet conducted a provocative cross-cultural analysis of the relationship between diet and mental illness. His primary finding was a strong link between high sugar consumption and the risk of both depression and schizophrenia.

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Chlorine in Tap Water

Posted December 30, 2009

Thousands of American municipalities add chlorine to their drinking water to get rid of contaminants like nitrates, arsenic and pesticides. But this inexpensive and highly effective disinfectant has a dark side. ìChlorine, added as an inexpensive and effective drinking water disinfectant, is also a known poison to the body,î says Vanessa Lausch of filter manufacturer Aquasana.

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Soil studies reveal rise in antibiotic resistance

Posted December 30, 2009

Antibiotic resistance in the natural environment is rising despite tighter controls over our use of antibiotics in medicine and agriculture, Newcastle University scientists have found. Bacterial DNA extracted from soil samples collected between 1940 and 2008 has revealed a rise in background levels of antibiotic resistant genes.

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