Natural Health Science News The latest news and top resources on natural health.

Consumption

New school meal standards significantly increase fruit, vegetable consumption

Posted March 6, 2014

New federal standards launched in 2012 that require schools to offer healthier meals have led to increased fruit and vegetable consumption, according to a new study. The study, the first to examine school food consumption both before and after the standards went into effect, contradicts criticisms that the new standards have increased food waste. “There is a push from some organizations and lawmakers to weaken the new standards. We hope the findings, which show that students are consuming more fruits and vegetables, will discourage those efforts,” said the lead author.

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Yogurt consumption reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes

Posted February 7, 2014

New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes) shows that higher consumption of yoghurt, compared with no consumption, can reduce the risk of new-onset type 2 diabetes by 28%. Scientists at the University of Cambridge found that in fact higher consumption of low-fat fermented dairy products, which include all yoghurt varieties and some low-fat cheeses, also reduced the relative risk of diabetes by 24% overall.

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Farmers’ market use is associated with fruit and vegetable consumption in diverse southern rural communities

Posted January 10, 2014

While farmers’ markets are a potential strategy to increase access to fruits and vegetables in rural areas, more information is needed regarding use of farmers’ markets among rural residents. Thus, this study’s purpose was to examine socio-demographic characteristics of participants; barriers and facilitators to farmers’ market shopping in southern rural communities; and associations between farmers’ market use with fruit and vegetable consumption and body mass index (BMI).

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Study: Slower-Paced Meal Reduces Hunger but Affects Calorie Consumption Differently

Posted January 6, 2014

Obesity rates in the United States increased from 14.5% of the population in 1971-1974 to 35.9% of the population in 2009-2010. It’s believed that one contributing factor to expanding waistlines is the reported increase in energy intake. Research suggests that the ability to control energy intake may be affected by the speed at which we eat, and a high eating rate may impair the relationship between the sensory signals and processes that regulate how much we eat.

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Slower-paced meal reduces hunger but affects calorie consumption differently

Posted December 30, 2013

Obesity rates in the United States increased from 14.5% of the population in 1971-1974 to 35.9% of the population in 2009-2010. It’s believed that one contributing factor to expanding waistlines is the reported increase in energy intake. Research suggests that the ability to control energy intake may be affected by the speed at which we eat, and a high eating rate may impair the relationship between the sensory signals and processes that regulate how much we eat.

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Study: Nut Consumption Linked to Reduced Death Rate

Posted November 22, 2013

In the largest study of its kind, people who ate a daily handful of nuts were 20 percent less likely to die from any cause over a 30-year period than were those who didn’t consume nuts, say scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the Harvard School of Public Health.

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First prospective study to date on nut consumption and pancreatic cancer

Posted November 11, 2013

In a large prospective study published online in the British Journal of Cancer, researchers looked at the association between nut consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer among 75,680 women in the Nurses’ Health Study, with no previous history of cancer. Consumption of nuts, including tree nuts (such as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts), was inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer, independent of other potential risk factors for pancreatic cancer.

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Coffee Consumption Cuts Liver Cancer Risk

Posted October 23, 2013

Three cups of coffee per day can reduce the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by more than 50 percent, reveals study. The research also indicated that three cups of coffee per day reduces liver cancer risk by more than 50 percent.

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Experts Confirm That Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Reduces Risk of Mortality

Posted September 27, 2013

A European study analyzes the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of mortality. As previous research has already suggested, this study concludes that fruit and vegetable consumption reduces all-cause mortality, and especially cardiovascular disease mortality.

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Ease of access improves fruit and vegetable consumption

Posted September 4, 2013

Low-income communities have particular problems getting adequate fruits and vegetables because of limited access to supermarkets and farmers markets. A new study from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center shows that community-supported agriculture (CSA) programs may be a feasible approach for providing fresh fruits and vegetables to under-resourced communities.

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