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Gooseberry

Indian gooseberry (amla) extracts show anti-inflammatory and blood flow benefits

Posted October 31, 2013

Extracts from Indian Gooseberry (Emblica officinalis Gaertn.) may be an effective anti-inflammatory agent and anticoagulant, according to a new study from Japan.

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Indian gooseberry extract (Capros) may counter endothelial dysfunction in diabetics: RCT

Posted July 31, 2013

Daily supplements of an extract from Indian gooseberry (Phyllanthus emblica) may improve the health of cells lining the blood vessels, and reduce levels of markers of oxidative stress in type-2 diabatics, according to results of a randomized, double-blind, controlled study.

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Effects of Indian Gooseberry on Health and Disease

Posted March 24, 2013

Indian Gooseberry or Amla (Emblica officinalis) also called as Amalaki or Dhatriphala in Sanskrit is one of the most valuable fruits discovered till date by mankind. Abundantly growing in India, the tree is found in deciduous forests across the Indian subcontinent. It is the most commonly used ingredient of most Ayurvedic preparations in some form or the other.

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A natural dye obtained from lichens may combat Alzheimer’s disease

Posted April 30, 2012

A red dye derived from lichens that has been used for centuries to color fabrics and food appears to reduce the abundance of small toxic protein aggregates in Alzheimer’s disease. The dye, a compound called orcein, and a related substance, called O4, bind preferentially to small amyloid aggregates that are considered to be toxic and cause neuronal dysfunction and memory impairment in Alzheimer’s disease.

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Scientists Liking Lichens as Possible Help for Alzheimer’s

Posted April 30, 2012

You might not give a second glance to lichens clinging to a rock or tree trunk, but this composite of organisms may provide some possible help for managing Alzheimers disease. A red dye called orcein that is derived from lichens along with another dye called O4 appear to attach themselves to amyloids, which are believed to play a major contributing role in Alzheimers disease, and render them nontoxic.

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