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Licorice Root

The controversy over black licorice

Posted November 4, 2012

Leave it to the federal government to sound an alarm when one is not really needed. Often such tactics are really a smokescreen to take the public’s focus off issues that are more crucial. Could this be such a ruse, to distract us from the real problems such as genetically-modified organisms (GMOs)?

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Licorice root extract proven to decrease liver enzymes

Posted June 18, 2012

Analysis of a small sample of blood is used for determining the amount of enzyme production of the liver, thus providing a marker for liver health in general. When the liver is distressed, damaged, or diseased, liver cells leak two specific enzymes into the blood stream.

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The Role of Soluble Fiber Intake in Patients under Highly Effective Lipid-lowering Therapy

Posted April 30, 2012

It has been demonstrated that statins can increase intestinal sterol absorption. Augments in phytosterolemia seems related to cardiovascular disease. We examined the role of soluble fiber intake in endogenous cholesterol synthesis and in sterol absorption among subjects under highly effective lipid-lowering therapy.

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Effect of plant sterols on the lipid profile of patients with hypercolesterolaemia. Randomised, experimental study

Posted April 30, 2012

Studies have been conducted on supplementing the daily diet with plant sterol ester-enriched milk derivatives in order to reduce LDL-cholesterol levels and, consequently, cardiovascular risk. However, clinical practice guidelines on hypercholesterolaemia state that there is not sufficient evidence to recommend their use in subjects with hypercholesterolaemia.

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Seaweed Does The Heart Good

Posted April 30, 2012

In both Ireland and Canada (provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador), seaweeds have a long tradition of use. In Ireland, for example, approximately 36,000 tonnes of seaweed are harvested annually. Seaweed species of commercial interest in Ireland include Laminaria digitata and Fucus species (Fucus vesiculosus, Fucus serratus and Fucus spiralis), which are harvested primarily for their valuable carbohydrates, Laminarin and Fucoidan, respectively. The value-added sector of the seaweed industry in Ireland has emerged to produce attractive, high-quality products for use as functional body care products and cosmetics.

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Drinking Carrot Juice Increases Total Antioxidant Status and Decreases Lipid Peroxidation in Adults

Posted April 30, 2012

High prevalence of obesity and cardiovascular disease is attributable to sedentary lifestyle and eating diets high in fat and refined carbohydrate while eating diets low in fruit and vegetables. Epidemiological studies have confirmed a strong association between eating diets rich in fruits and vegetables and cardiovascular health.

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Probiotics May Decrease Total Cholesterol Levels

Posted April 30, 2012

A diet rich in probiotics may decrease total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, researchers found, in this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of probiotics consumption on blood lipids.

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Coenzyme Q10, Copper, Zinc, and Lipid Peroxidation Levels in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Posted April 30, 2012

Researchers investigated levels of lipid peroxidation, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations. A patient group with COPD acute exacerbation (n=45) and a control group of healthy smokers (n=45) were included in the study.

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Sesame Seed Supplementation May Reduce Oxidative Stress

Posted April 30, 2012

The effects of sesame seeds on reducing serum lipids and enhancing antioxidant capacity were researched in this study. Hyperlipidemic patients (n=38) were divided into two groups (treatment group received 40 g white sesame seeds daily, with 240 kcal was removed from their diet) and for all individuals, the same drug treatments were considered for 60 days.

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