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Preterm

Mother’s diet linked to premature birth: fruits, vegetables linked to reduced risk of preterm delivery

Posted March 5, 2014

Pregnant women who eat a ‘prudent’ diet rich in vegetables, fruits, whole grains and who drink water have a significantly reduced risk of preterm delivery, suggests a study. A “traditional” dietary pattern of boiled potatoes, fish and cooked vegetables was also linked to a significantly lower risk. Although these findings cannot establish causality, they support dietary advice to pregnant women to eat a balanced diet including vegetables, fruit, whole grains, and fish and to drink water.

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Study: Probiotics Can Help Save the Lives of Preterm Infants

Posted December 16, 2013

A newly published study in the acknowledged scientific journal Pediatrics has showed that daily intake of Chr. Hansen’s probiotics more than halved the risk of the deadly stomach disease necrotizing enterocolitis Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). NEC is a very serious condition, where parts of the intestine may undergo tissue death.

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Higher doses of vitamin D recommended for preterm infants

Posted May 13, 2013

The risk for rickets among premature infants and children with markedly low vitamin D levels has caused various organizations to establish different dosing recommendations. At the 2013 Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting, researchers reported that preterm infants should be administered 800 IU per day for ideal bone strength.

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AAP: Preemie Bones Need Dietary Boost

Posted April 29, 2013

Preterm infants with a feeding tube need extra calcium, vitamin D, and phosphorus added to their diet for healthy bones, according to American Academy of Pediatric (AAP) guidelines.

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Probiotic gum beats placebo for bad breath: Study

Posted April 30, 2012

Lactobacillus reuteri-containing gum can significantly reduce halitosis, Danish researchers have found, although the mechanism of action remains a mystery.

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