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Red Grape

Two Fruits Seem Superior For Your Immune System

Posted September 21, 2013

Scientists analyzed nearly 450 compounds and found that two substances present in two delicious fruits appear far better than others when it comes to helping your immune system. Are those two fruits in your house right now?

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Red Grapes, Blueberries May Enhance Immune Function

Posted September 18, 2013

In an analysis of 446 compounds for their the ability to boost the innate immune system in humans, researchers in the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University discovered just two that stood out from the crowd – the resveratrol found in red grapes and a compound called pterostilbene from blueberries.

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3 Questions: MIT biologist on new resveratrol study

Posted March 10, 2013

New research has shown for the first time that resveratrol, a compound found in grapes and red wine that can counteract the effects of aging, acts by directly activating sirtuins. In the early 1990s, MIT professor Leonard Guarente discovered that sirtuins, a class of proteins found in nearly all animals, protect against the effects of aging in yeast; similar effects have since been seen in many other organisms. In 2003, David Sinclair, who had been a postdoc in Guarente’s lab, found that resveratrol, a compound found in grapes and red wine, can also counteract the effects of aging. Since then, many scientists have tried to tease out the exact relationship among sirtuins, resveratrol and aging.

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Red Wine And Red Grapes Help Protect Against Hearing Loss And Cognitive Decline

Posted February 24, 2013

Red wine and red grapes contain resveratrol, a substance which appears to protect against hearing loss and cognitive decline, researchers from the Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, reported in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.

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Religion Might Boost Happiness in Times of Stress

Posted April 30, 2012

Religious people outnumber and are happier than atheists in societies facing hardship or conflict, a new study indicates. In more stable, peaceful nations, however, researchers noted no such link. Not only are fewer people religious in more stable societies, but they’re happier than those in regions where there’s hardship and strife, regardless of their religious beliefs.

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Study connects religious service attendance to less depression

Posted April 30, 2012

A new study published in the Journal of Religion and Health has connected the regular attendance of religious services with an increased level of optimism and a decreased risk of depression.

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