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Your Bones – Updated and Expanded Edition
How You Can Prevent Osteoporosis & Have Strong Bones for Life—Naturally
By Lara Pizzorno, MA, LMT, with Jonathan V. Wright, MD
March 2013; Paperback; 496 pages; ISBN: 978-1-60766-013-2
$12.00 $10.80 (10% discount!) Free Shipping

“Osteoporosis is that sleeping giant that can sneak up on our aging population. Lara Pizzorno finally shines light on this hidden epidemic and what you can do about it. If you are over 50, read this book! Lara, thanks for writing this book. I have given it to my wife.”

—Wayne Jonas, MD, President and CEO of Samueli Institute

Summary

Osteoporosis—porous, brittle bones—is a common scourge, afflicting people in ever-growing numbers. Yet drugs like Fosamax®, Boniva®, Reclast®, Prolia®, Xgeva®, and Forteo® should be your last choice for healthy bones. Many actually increase your risk for bone fractures, esophageal cancer, and arrhythmia, and can kill jaw bone tissue! One can cause life-threatening high blood levels of calcium and low levels of magnesium—it even caused aggressive bone cancer in 45% of animal study subjects. None of these drugs can safely be used long-term.

Are women genetically programmed to develop weak, brittle bones? Emphatically, no! Your Bones uncovers the real culprits responsible for the osteoporosis epidemic. Not only will it teach you how to identify and eliminate the factors in your life that are putting your bones at risk, it will also arm you with the cutting-edge information you need to prevent osteoporosis and maintain strong, healthy bones for life—and do it safely and naturally, relying on diet, supplements, and exercise.

This UPDATED AND EXPANDED edition includes many new studies confirming the dangers of bisphosphonate drugs, as well as in-depth discussion of denosumab and teriparatide, two new drugs with potential adverse effects even worse than the bisphosphonates. More information is provided on commonly prescribed, bone-busting patent medicines, along with the latest information on how to best supplement with calcium, strontium, vitamin K2, and zinc. New sections are included on great bone-building exercises, and lab tests to confirm you are building bone or help identify what’s causing your bone loss.

About the Authors

Lara Pizzorno, MA, LMT, is the managing editor for Longevity Medicine Review and senior medical editor for SaluGenecists, Inc. She is co-author of Natural Medicine Instructions for Patients, co-author of The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods, and editor of The World’s Healthiest Foods: Essential Guide for the Healthiest Way of Eating.

Jonathan V. Wright, MD, is the founder and medical director of Tahoma Clinic in Renton, Washington. With degrees from Harvard and the University of Michigan, Dr. Wright has been at the forefront of natural biomedical research and treatment since 1973 and has written many best-selling books including Your Stomach, also published by Praktikos Books.

Featured on Hispanic Marketing & Public Relations website and podcast (October 4, 2013):

“Former osteopenia sufferer, doctor share natural path to healthy bones”

[Feature: Hispanicmpr.com]

Barbara Bamberger Scott, ForeWord (May 2011):

“Your Bones provides valuable, detailed information on the best balance of exercise (short bursts of vigorous walking and weight-bearing workouts), targeted diet (organic, vegetarian, and low-fat), and supplements needed to guard against crippling or fatal bone loss.”

[Complete review: ForewordReviews.com]

Mindy Rhiger, Library Journal (April 15, 2011):

“The information is presented in a straightforward and easy-to-read style that will be understandable to lay readers. Consumer(s)…looking for [a] book about the natural ways to prevent osteoporosis would do well to choose this title.”

[Complete review: LibraryJournal.com] Health & Medicine

Midwest Book Review (June 2011, Small Press Bookwatch – Health/Medicine Shelf):

Your bones are under the constant stress of life, so it’s best to take care of them. “Your Bones: How You Can Prevent Osteoporosis & Have Strong Bones for Life-Naturally” is a guide to greater bone health, as Lara Pizzorno advises women how to age with healthy bones, and dispel the myth that women have naturally fragile bones in old age. Warning against the dangers of osteoporosis drugs and the dangers they pose, she encourages old-fashioned diet & exercise for health into the gray years. “Your Bones” is a must for any active woman who wants to stay active.

[MidwestBookReview.com]

Spirit of Change Magazine (Spring, 2011):

“Lara Pizzorno emphatically raises the red flag on conventional bone medicine…. Highlighting natural prevention and treatment strategies for different situations, Your Bones offers uncomplicated scientific advice for bone health.”

[Complete review: SpiritofChange.org] (See Spring 2011 edition, page 49)

Featured on Positive Health Online:

[PositiveHealth.com]

Praise for Your Bones

“This is a book filled with wisdom and information written in a style which is easy to understand and put to use. I heartily recommend it to all those who care about maintaining a healthy body.”

Bernie Siegel, MD (Author of Faith, Hope & Healing and 365 Prescriptions for the Soul)

“Your Bones is a down-to-earth guide to osteoporosis, one of the most common health challenges of modern life. If you are 30 or older, you cannot afford to ignore the wisdom in this book.”

Larry Dossey, MD (Author of The Science of Premonitions, Healing Words, and Reinventing Medicine)

“This superb text explains the causes and solutions of osteoporosis, and its associated problems, comprehensively, clearly, and accurately. Despite the complexity of the condition, this is an easy read, with no dumbing down of the content—brilliantly highlighting safe, natural, and effective prevention and treatment strategies. Highly recommended.”

Leon Chaitow, ND, DO (Honorary Fellow, University of Westminster, London Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies)

“This is one of the best books ever written on bone health—absolutely fantastic! In this book, Lara Pizzorno, MA, provides scientifically based advice for men and women of all ages to help them develop and maintain strong healthy bones. She makes a complex issue easily comprehensible and provides information that empowers the reader to take measures towards ensuring their own bone health. I highly recommend it.”

George Mateljan (Philanthropist, Author of the book, The World’s Healthiest Foods)

“I found Your Bones by Lara Pizzorno to be highly readable, provocative and often persuasive. Do, please, read this book. It is full of startling insights into the nature of age-related bone loss.”

Peter D’Adamo, ND, MIFHI

“Everything you need to know for healthy bones in one book. Packed with facts, this book is as easy to read as the tips and insights to bone-building living are easy to implement. Informative and inspiring.”

Lani Lopez, BHSc, Adv Dip Nat.

Hispanic MPR.com

November 4, 2013

Listen to podcast interview with Lara Pizzorno, MDiv, author, Your Bones, about bone health

A podcast interview with Lara Pizzorno, MDiv, author, Your Bones is available in the Podcast Section of Hispanic Marketing & Public Relations, HispanicMPR.com. During the podcast, she discusses her book and bone health with Elena del Valle, host of the HispanicMPR.com podcast.

[Complete podcast: HispanicMPR.com]

Health Talk – WOR NewsTalk Radio 710

April 19, 2011

Dr. Ronald Hoffman was joined by author Lara Pizzorno to discuss her new book, Your Bones: How You Can Prevent Osteoporosis & Have Strong Bones for Life Naturally. Lara’s book talks about the importance of bone health and how to fight osteoporosis. Together they discussed the dangers of osteoporosis and the importance of bone health through proper nutrition and care.

[Complete interview: WOR 710]

Interview with Deborah Ray

May 2, 2011

[Complete interview: PraktikosInstitute.org]

The Natural Nurse – Interview with Ellen Kamhi

Host Ellen Kamhi PhD RN,www.naturalnurse.com, interviews Lara Pizzorno, MA, LMT. Lara is the managing editor for Longevity Medicine Review and senior medical editor for SaluGenecists, Inc. She is co-author of Natural Medicine Instructions for Patients, co-author of The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods, and editor of The World’s Healthiest Foods: Essential Guide for the Healthiest Way of Eating. In addition to reviewing the latest in longevity research for clinicians, Lara summarizes health and nutrition research for the Textbook of Natural Medicine e-dition, The World’s Healthiest Foods, and Dr. Pizzorno’s blog as WebMD’s Integrative Medicine & Wellness Expert. On today’s show, Lara discusses how you can prevent osteoporosis and support Bone Health for life!

[Complete interview: NaturalNurse060611]

Algae Cal Website Article by Lara Pizzorno

More Evidence Confirms Bisphosphonates are Not Your Bones’ Best Friends

[Link to Article]

National Osteoporosis Foundation Website Discussion

[Link to Discussion]

Preface

PART 1: YOU ARE AT RISK FOR OSTEOPOROSIS

1: If You Are a Woman, You’re at High Risk for Osteoporosis

What Is Osteoporosis?

PART 2: WHY CONVENTIONAL MEDICINE IS NOT THE ANSWER FOR STRONG BONES

2: The Bisphosphonate Patent Medicines Prescribed to Prevent Osteoporosis Should Be Your Last Choice for Healthy Bones

The Bisphosphonate Patent Medicines Prescribed for Osteoporosis (e.g., Fosamax, Actonel, Boniva, Reclast), Have Very Nasty Side Effects

Bisphosphonates: A Long List of Other Adverse Side Effects

More Evidence Confirms Bisphosphonates (e.g., Fosamax, Reclast, Aclasta, Actonel, Boniva) Are NOT Your Bones’ Best Friends

Denosumab (aka Prolia, Xgeva)—Even Worse than the Bisphosphonates

Why You Should Forego Forteo

Latest Research Proves You Can Restore the Health of Your Bones—Safely and Effectively—Naturally

PART 3: WHAT INCREASES YOUR RISK FOR OSTEOPOROSIS?

3: What You Don’t Know Can Give You Osteoporosis

Are You Sure You’re Getting Enough Calcium?

How Much Protein Do YOU Need?

Refined Sugars Make Your Belly Fat but Your Bones Skinny

Soft Drinks Are Hard on Bones

Greens Give the Go-Ahead for Great Bones; Their Absence Slams the Brakes on Bone-Building

“Bs” for Better Bones

“C” Your Way to Stronger Bones

4: What Else Increases My Risk for Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis, a Family Affair?

Gastric Bypass: Free Pass? Not for Your Bones

The Liver–Kidney Connection to Bone

What’s Hyperparathyroidism and Why Should My Bones Care?

Do Your Favorite Activities All Involve Sitting?

Getting Any . . . Sunshine?

Gloria Vanderbilt Once Said, “A Woman Can’t Be Too Rich or Too Thin.” She Was Half-Wrong

Bone-Busting Patent Medicines

Are Your Bones Going up in Smoke?

More than Two Drinks of Liquor Makes Bone Loss Much Quicker

Fluoride: Could Your Tap Water or Toothpaste Be Destroying Your Bones?

5: What Men Don’t Know Can Increase Their Risk for Osteoporosis

What Are the Key Risk Factors for Osteoporosis in Men?

6: Chances Are, You Are Already Losing Bone

How Can I Tell if I’m Losing Bone?

What Tests Are Used to Check for Bone Loss? What Qualifies as Osteoporosis?

What to Expect If You Don’t Take Steps to Actively Prevent Bone Loss: What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Osteoporosis?

PART 4. HOW TO HAVE STRONG BONES FOR LIFE

7: Strong Bones for Life, Naturally

What Your Bones Really Need to Stay Strong

Bone-Building Vitamins

Key Bone-Building Minerals

Bio-Identical Hormone Replacement Builds Bone

The Bone-Building Diet (I Can Eat My Way to Strong, Healthy Bones?)

Bone-Building Exercises

8: If I Follow These Recommendations, What Can I Expect? How Soon Will I See Results?

Appendix A: Lab Tests For Your Bones

Labs That Can Help Confirm YOU Are No Longer Losing Excessive Amounts of Bone

Appendix B: Vitamin and Mineral Essentials for Healthy Bones

Resources

Where Can I Find an “Integrative” Doctor Who Will Help Me Build and Keep My Bones Strong, Naturally?

Additional Helpful Resources

More Information on STOTT PILATES® for Osteoporosis

Contact Lara Pizzorno

Glossary

Endnotes

About the Authors

Index

Tables

Foods Rich in Calcium

Daily Protein Requirements by Weight

Foods Rich in Protein

Best Food Sources of Vitamin B6

Best Food Sources of Vitamin B12

Best Food Sources of Riboflavin

Best Food Sources of Folate

Foods Rich in Vitamin C

Fluoride Content of Commonly Consumed Foods and Beverages

Food Sources of Vitamin K1, MK-4, MK-7

Components of Bone-Health Supplements Provided to Algaecal-1 Group and Algaecal-2 Group

Comparison of Three Algaecal Bone-Health Supplement Plans

Foods Rich in Magnesium

Foods Rich in Zinc

Extension Exercises Lower but Flexion Exercises Increase Fracture

From PART 1: YOU ARE AT RISK FOR OSTEOPOROSIS

Chapter 1: If You Are a Woman, You’re at High Risk for Osteoporosis

What Is Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis—literally, “porous bone” (osteo = bone, porosis = porous)—is a progressive loss of bone that results in bone thinning and increased vulnerability to fracture. Osteoporotic fractures—also called fragility fractures because they happen in thinned out, fragile bone—occur primarily in the wrist, rib, spine, and hip, often during daily activities, such as stepping off a curb, which should normally pose no risk for a fracture.

Why Are Women at Higher Risk Than Men of Losing Too Much Bone?

For Two Key Reasons:

First, women start out with less bone than men. Women’s peak bone mass is naturally less than men’s because women are smaller and have less muscle. When we use our muscles, the muscle contractions put stress on bone, to which it responds by becoming stronger. Men’s larger muscles produce stronger contractions, resulting in more stress and approximately 35–40% larger bones.

Secondly, the female hormones, estrogen and progesterone, play vital roles in bone remodeling, and levels of both hormones drop with menopause (medically defined as the last menstrual period); for most women in the Western world, the median age for menopause is 51, but the range for its onset is large—generally If You Are a Woman between ages 42 and 58. Estrogen prevents excessive action by osteoclasts, specialized bone cells that remove worn out or dead bone to make room for new bone. Progesterone is required by osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells

that pull calcium, magnesium, and phosphorous from the blood to build new bone. Production of both hormones greatly declines during a woman’s transition through menopause, resulting in increased bone resorption and decreased formation of new bone.

Am I Really at Risk? How Common Is Osteoporosis?

If you are a woman, the answer is emphatically “Yes!” One in four women will develop osteoporosis after menopause. Lifetime risk for fragility fractures, an indicator of osteoporosis, is 50% in women versus 25% in men. Twenty-five million Americans have osteoporosis or are at significant risk for it. Osteoporosis is responsible for at least 1.5 million fractures each year, including 250,000 hip fractures.

Men Are Not Immune to Osteoporosis

Although women are most at risk, 25–33% of men will experience an osteoporotic fracture in their lifetime. In men, however, the rapid increase in fracture risk begins later, at approximately age 70.

From PART 2: WHY CONVENTIONAL MEDICINE IS NOT THE ANSWER FOR STRONG BONES

Chapter 2: The Bisphosphonate Patent Medicines Prescribed to Prevent Osteoporosis Should Be Your Last Choice for Healthy Bones

It’s true, as Sally Field emphasizes in her TV ads for Boniva, that you have only one body. It’s not true that Boniva or the other bisphosphonate patent medicines commonly prescribed to prevent osteoporosis offer the best way to take care of it!

The Bisphosphonate Patent Medicines Prescribed for Osteoporosis (e.g., Fosamax, Actonel, Boniva, Reclast), Have Very Nasty Side Effects

Although prescribed to 30 million Americans each year, the bisphosphonate patent medicines (the oral forms, including Fosamax Boniva, Actonel, and the latest additions to the bisphosphonate arsenal, the once yearly IV-administered patent medicines Reclast and Aclasta), are well known to be dangerous.

An FDA alert, issued January 2008, warned physicians that all bisphosphonate patent medicines may cause “severe and sometimes incapacitating bone, joint, and/or muscle (musculoskeletal) pain . . . [which] may occur within days, months, or years” after starting the medication, and in some patients, may not resolve even after discontinuing the patent medicine.

Even more alarming, these patent medicines have now been conclusively linked to a number of other serious adverse side effects including osteonecrosis of the jaw (jaw bone death, osteo = bone, necrosis = death), atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat), and increased risk of bone fragility leading to bone fracture—yes, that’s right, an increased risk of bone fracture from the very patent medicines prescribed to prevent it!

Bisphosphonates Don’t Build Healthy, New Bone—They Cause Retention of Old, Brittle Bone

The bisphosphonate patent medicines suppress the activity of osteoclasts, the body’s specialized cells whose job it is to remove worn out, injured, or otherwise damaged bone. This is a task that must be taken care of before such weakened bone can be replaced with new strong bone.

Osteoclasts are the first phase of the bone renewal process. They take out the bone “trash” to make room for new bone. If osteoclasts are prevented from doing this necessary job—which they very effectively are by bisphosphonates, which work by literally poisoning osteoclasts—damaged bone is left in place rather than cleared out, so no room is made for new bone to be laid down. Eventually, the amount of unhealthy, compromised bone tissue accumulates to the point that bones become very fragile, and any trauma or insult heals poorly, if at all.

The bisphosphonates don’t just inhibit, they virtually crush all new bone formation. Researchers at the University of Texas performed bone biopsies on nine women who had been taking Fosamax for 3 to 8 years, but had nevertheless suffered non-spinal fractures (in the lower back, ribs, hip, or femur) while performing normal daily activities (walking, standing, turning around). New bone formation in these women was nearly a hundred times lower than that normally seen in postmenopausal women.

* * * *

More Evidence Confirms Bisphosphonates (e.g., Fosamax, Reclast, Aclasta, Actonel, Boniva) Are NOT Your Bones’ Best Friends

Since the publication of the first edition of Your Bones in April 2011, a great deal more evidence has surfaced confirming that your risk of an osteoporotic fracture is not going to be lessened—but, in fact, may be increased, by taking any of the bisphosphonates.

As of April 2012, 630 papers had been published in the peer-reviewed medical literature on PubMed discussing adverse events caused by the bisphospho­nates, including 201 review articles. (These are papers that summarize a number of studies in one article.) Here’s a quick overview of just a small selection from the important recently published papers that provide many reasons why relying on a bisphosphonate, like Fosamax, Boniva, or Reclast, is more likely to harm you rather than help your bones.

From PART 4: HOW TO HAVE STRONG BONES FOR LIFE

Chapter 7: Strong Bones for Life, Naturally

What Your Bones Really Need to Stay Strong

As you now know, bone is dynamic, living tissue that is constantly being broken down and rebuilt, regardless of one’s age or sex. Until recently, not getting enough calcium and women’s postmenopausal drop in estrogen were singled out as the only issues. Today, vitamin D’s importance for bone health is once again being recognized.

It’s true that calcium, vitamin D, and estrogen play key roles in preventing osteoporosis, but maintaining healthy bones throughout life requires a good deal more than simply calcium, estrogen, and vitamin D. Normal bone metabolism is a complex dance among over two dozen nutrients including the vitamins K (especially K2), B6, B12, and folate as well as vitamin D, and the minerals boron, magnesium, phosphorous, zinc, manganese, copper, silicon, molybdenum, selenium—and possibly strontium—as well as calcium.

Also, while estrogen regulates the action of osteoclasts, specialized bone cells that remove dead portions of demineralized bone, progesterone is required by the osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells that pull calcium, magnesium, and phosphorous from the blood to build new bone mass.

What you need to know about each of these factors essential for building and maintaining healthy bones is discussed below and in Appendix B.

* * * *

Bone-Building Exercises

Use It or Lose It

Lack of weight-bearing and resistance exercise is a well-documented risk factor for osteoporosis. Numerous studies show that not moving against gravity—whether as a result of being an astronaut on a space mission, in bed recovering from a surgery or illness, or life as a couch potato—leads to massive loss of bone minerals, as much as 1% of bone mineral mass per week!

On the other hand, consistent bone-building exercise is one of the most effective ways to decrease your fracture risk. In response to resistance exercise train­ing (any type of exercise that puts real demands on muscle and thus its attachments to bone), a number of studies of postmenopausal women have shown that bone responds with increases in bone mineral density sufficient to move these women back toward the norm seen in healthy younger women.

After a year of regular exercise, the typical gain in BMD is 1–3%. Doesn’t sound like all that much—until you real­ize that, without exercise, after age 40, women start los­ing BMD at a rate of 0.3–0.5% per year. The rate of BMD loss increases after age 50 to about 1–1.5% per year, and frequently ramps up to more than 2% per year during the first 6–10 years after menopause, after which it slows back down to somewhere between 1–2% per year.

If regular exercise can give you a gain in BMD of 1–3% per year instead of a loss of 1–2% a year, it’s actu­ally preventing a 1–2% loss plus adding another 1–3% in BMD—this translates into an actual gain in BMD from exercise of 2–5% per year.

However, exercise is definitely a “keep using it or keep losing it” situation. In studies in which post­menopausal women stopped exercising, the gains they made in spinal bone mineral density were lost after a period of inactivity.

E-mail Lara Pizzorno @LaraPizzorno

The photo is of me, Your Bones co-author Lara, aged 60, on a 2009 Mother’s Day hike in Stehekin, Washington. I was diagnosed with osteopenia in my very early 50s. Today, I have strong, healthy bones, which I credit to having done everything recommended in this book. I am genetically at very high risk for osteoporosis, but now I will be the first woman in my family in all the generations I know about not to die an osteoporosis-related death. You too can have strong, healthy bones for life.

Q & A with Author Lara Pizzorno

Why did you want to write this book? What motivated you?

I wrote Your Bones because I know—with 100% certainty—that you are not predetermined to develop osteoporosis. Current medical research has clearly revealed the numerous factors that can promote excessive bone loss—and every single one is correctable or modifiable. Bottom line—I wrote this book because we are being misled and harmed, and having the knowledge of how to safely and naturally promote bone health, I had to pass it on.

Why do you know Your Bones can help me not only avoid osteoporosis but maintain a healthy, strong, erect skeleton?

I know it not only because I have read literally thousands of studies in the peer-reviewed medical literature relating to the latest scientific discoveries about bone remodeling and bone health, but deep down at the most personal level. I know it because of what happened to all the generations of women in my family and to me, personally.

What’s your personal story?

As I mentioned, osteoporosis runs in my family, so I’ve long known I am at high risk. Despite my family history, and being short and small boned, I figured I would do much better: I exercised, ate right, and married a naturopathic doctor who ensured I took my vitamins. All of which is necessary, but for me, was not enough.

So, you exercised and ate “right” but were still en route to osteoporosis?

Yes. Much to my (and my husband Joe’s) chagrin, despite living this supposedly ideal lifestyle, an annual checkup in my late 40s revealed I had developed osteopenia. If I had not been married to a brilliant, cutting edge naturopathic physician, I would now have full blown osteoporosis. I would also have been on a bisphosphonate for way more than 5 years, so, in addition, by now I might have osteonecrosis of the jaw, an irregular heartbeat (atrial fibrillation), and/or have broken both femurs or a hip anyway.

How did you turn it around?

Fortunately for me, Joe knew about very recently developed genetic tests that were just becoming available to clinicians, and one of the test panels evaluated a number of genetic risks for osteoporosis. He ran the osteoporosis panel on me and discovered my need for what back then was considered a truly outrageous amount of vitamin D. Once I got the vitamin D I needed—my body’s missing ingredient—my bones started rebuilding. Today, I am blessed with strong, healthy bones. I will be the first woman in my family not to succumb to an osteoporosis-related death.

What should I do to prevent osteoporosis? Can you “sum it up in 10 words or less”?

Sorry, no can do. This is why I wrote the book, and why I wrote it the way I did. Each of us is unique. My key issue is the fact that my genetic inheritance gifted me with vitamin D receptors that don’t work well, so I need much more of this critical bone nutrient than the “average” person. Your critical issues are most likely different from mine. Your Bones provides all the clues, and all the information you need to decide which ones are most relevant for your unique situation and physiology.

For Immediate Release

May 1, 2011

COMMON BISPHOSPHONATE DRUGS PRESCRIBED FOR OSTEOPOROSIS CAN CAUSE FRACTURES

FDA bulletin warns of bisphosphonate dangers. New book explains why conventional medicine is not the answer for strong bones.

Osteoporosis is a widespread problem. Nearly one-third of all women and one-sixth of all men will suffer an osteoporotic hip fracture. The most catastrophic of fractures, hip fracture leads to death in 12-20% of cases and long-term nursing home care for over 50% of those who survive. The medicines prescribed for osteoporosis should be your last choice: not only do they have terrible side effects; they cause retention of old, brittle bone instead of creating new, healthy bone!

Following their review of all available data on bisphosphonate use, on October 13, 2010, FDA issued a bulletin* warning patients and health care providers that all the bisphosphonates prescribed for osteoporosis increase risk for atypical thigh bone fractures and announced that the bisphosphonates must change their labeling and include a Medication Guide to ensure physician and patient awareness of this risk.

Your Bones: How You Can Prevent Osteoporosis & Have Strong Bones for Life—Naturally by Lara Pizzorno, MA, LMT with Jonathan V. Wright, MD details specific dietary changes and nutritional supplements that can prevent and reverse osteoporosis—naturally—as well as other steps to take including topics to discuss with one’s doctor or practitioner. It is an important down-to-earth handbook written in a style which is as easy to read as the tips and insights on bone-building living are easy to implement.

*FDA Drug Safety Communication. http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm229009.htm.;

FDA Consumer Update. http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm229127.htm.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS:

Lara Pizzorno, MA, LMT, is the managing editor for Longevity Medicine Review and senior medical editor for SaluGenecists, Inc. She is co-author of Natural Medicine Instructions for Patients, co-author of The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods, and editor of The World’s Healthiest Foods: Essential Guide for the Healthiest Way of Eating.

Jonathan V. Wright, MD,is the founder and medical director of Tahoma Clinic in Renton, Washington. With advanced degrees from Harvard and the University of Michigan, Dr. Wright has been at the forefront of natural biomedical research and treatment since 1973 and has written many best-selling books including Your Stomach, also published by Praktikos Books.

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